Lanyard

Primary Research; Draping A Nebula

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Josiah McElheny, Wall Drawings for a Chandelier (2005).

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Primary Research; Abstract Chandeliers & Big Bang Collage

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Josiah McElheny, Conceptual Analysis

"'Island Universe' is a fusion of design, science and the history of art, and the installation seems to have arrived intact from the mid-sixties; at the same time, the work is infused with contemporary sociology and cosmology." - White Cube (2008)

I love the intersectional and abstract message that McElheny is showing through sculpture, I enjoy the depth of research, starting with contemporary science on the history of the universe. Out of this transpires a linkage that most people would not see. This for me is inspiring, many elements all seemingly irrelevant yet, made relevant through these glass sculptures. I notice the sheen that is created by the glass, the smooth plains.

I am concerned that this is too abstract an idea to grasp for this project however I feel it works and is easily justified as explored here through my research - I want to make a 'Lanyard to a parallel universe'.

 

 

Josiah McElheny, Conceptual Analysis

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'Josiah McElheny', White Cube (2017)

"An End to Modernity (2005), which was worked out with the cosmologist David Weinberg, is at once a play on the designs of the chandeliers in New York’s Metropolitan Opera house and an expressive diagram of the big bang. “The whole project”, writes McElheny, “exists at the intersection of specific concepts and abstract ones”. The set of ideas that informed this project came to fruition with Island Universe (2008), a large installation of five sculptures, each a model of a hypothetical universe. Island Universe is a fusion of design, science and the history of art, an installation that is at once a manifestation of design and ideas from the mid-1960s and a sculpture infused with contemporary sociology and cosmology. Alongside a major, architectural installation created in collaboration with Chicago architect John Vinci for the Art Institute of Chicago in 2014, the artist’s most recent explorations into modernity have frequently centred on the work of the German architect and writer Paul Scheerbart. To date these include the film The Light Club of Vizcaya (2012), a re-imagining of his 1912 novella about a secret club for bathing in light, and a major reader on Scheerbart, which was published in 2014 by the University of Chicago Press."

Primary Research; Upside Down Drape & Big Bang Collage

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Abtract Collage; Visual Analysis

This collage directly leads into my draping, though abstract in content it helped me to understand what I which elements to cyphen and use for example the diagram of the Big Bang sucks and creates these 'voids' in between the chandeliers. I began looking at m-theory as well as black holes, the effect of these on the space around them. It was the 'sucking' effect that I wanted to capitalise on by using the tulle to create this effect. This was successfully done in my opinion as can be seen on my draping experiment which leads in to my outcome.

Josiah McElheny, Wall Drawings for a Chandelier (2005).

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People on a Rollercoaster Upside Down, Via Pinterest

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People on a Rollercoaster Upside Down, Via Pinterest

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People Stuck Upside Down on a Roller Coaster, Bustle.com (2014).

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Baselitz, G. 'Blick aus dem Fenster' (1982).

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Thaddeus Ropac on Georg Baselitz (2018)

"For Baselitz, the novel upside-down format was a way to empty form of its content, navigating between the two poles of abstraction and figuration, and revolutionising a medium that was then regarded as irredeemably conventional."

Baselitz, G. 'Nachtessen in Dresden', (1983).

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Lanyard Sketchbook (Pre-Portfolio)

Primary Research: 'Sucked in to Black Hole' Collage

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Viennese Chandelier via 1stDibs (2018).

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Josiah McElheny, Wall Drawings for a Chandelier (2005).

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Parallel Universe (Upside Down) - Definition & Analysis

A parallel universe is a hypothetical self-contained reality co-existing with one's own. A specific group of paralleluniverses are called a "multiverse", although this term can also be used to describe the possible parallel universes that constitute reality.

 

Observing my drapes, I am considering the possibility of parallel universes as well as movie references that explore this theme. Some of my friends suggested "Stranger Things' which I have seen, the parallel universe is literally called the 'Upside Down'. I have a desire to seek out more obscure references however.

Drape Experiment, Conceptual Analysis

Inspired by Baselitz’s paintings, I decided to pin a tailored suit jacket to my mannequin and then suspend the mannequin upside down, inverting the gravitational force and therefore causing the fabric to drape onto itself. I was deeply inspired by Baselitz’s work not just in the surface level ‘upside down’ motif, his interest in African art, also painting on to wooden sculpture which was an unusual practice when he was developing his artistic process. I intend to attempt this once more in order to explore this idea more thorough with a different approach. For this drape experiment I decided to begin with pinning the jacket as it would be worn. This was somewhat successful however in order to interrogate this idea further I decided to begin deconstructing the jacket and use the lining as the ‘garment’ and allowing the wool to drape of it’s own accord. This allowed for unexpected results that were organic and transformed the original garment into an unrecognisable object.

Ohne Titel; Historical Notes

"Ohne Titel [Untitled], 1983 and Kopf [Head], 1978/1984, have their origins in folk art and African carvings. Although the artist has described his sculptures as “more primitive, more brutal” than the paintings, they are nonetheless linked by the expressive brushstrokes with which he daubs both canvas and wooden object."

 

 - Thaddeus Ropac, 2018.

Baselitz, G. 'Ohne Titel' (1982-84).

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Nachtessen in Dresden; Historical Notes

"A further significant development in the 1980s was the appearance of religious iconography in Baselitz’s work, evident in paintings like Die Dornenkrönung [The Crowning with Thorns], 1983, and Der Bote [The Messenger], 1984, as well as his Nachtessen in Dresden [Supper in Dresden] and Ikone [Icon] drawings from the same period. These form part of a sequence of works created between 1983-84 that allude to Biblical narratives, such as the Last Supper and the Passion of Christ."

 

- Thaddeus Ropac, 2018

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